Friday, August 15, 2014

Race and Gender Issues

Gentrification And The Persistence Of Poor Minority Neighborhoods
"There is no more highly contentious issue among those of us who spend their time thinking about the future of cities than gentrification.

Its progress has been massively uneven, as change has tended to concentrate in large, knowledge-based cities like New York, L.A., Chicago, D.C., Boston, and San Francisco—with much less movement in older Rustbelt or sprawling Sunbelt cities, according to a Cleveland Fed study I wrote about last fall. Another recent study found that, for every single neighborhood that's gentrified since 1970, 10 have remained poor and another 12 have slipped into poverty.

When we talk about why some places gentrify and others don't, there's often a pressing, underlying question at stake: To what degree is gentrification bound up with and shaped by race?"

See recent study:  Divergent Pathways of Gentrification: Racial Inequality and the Social Order of Renewal in Chicago Neighborhoods


Vast Majority Of Blacks View The Criminal Justice System As Unfair
Blacks are much more likely than whites to say that blacks faced unfair treatment in dealing with police or in the courts, according to a 2013 Pew Research Center survey. And blacks perceived racial biases to be greater in the criminal justice system than in other institutions.


"Gender Inequality Affects All Women"
DMSS have released a report which analyses the risk factors associated with negative outcomes across the life course for women and girls. These poor outcomes include: involvement in the criminal justice system; homelessness; sexual exploitation; mental health problems; and, substance misuse.

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